Accutron Spaceview History

Accutron Spaceview History

Postby kahuna74 » Thu Dec 18, 2014 8:06 am

I thought I would share this here, as there is a lot of good history with Accutrons. Most of this can be found on the internet. A good place to start is with Accutron214.com. And there are others. I own one spaceview, 1969, as well as a 218 no date that I am the one and only owner of. I have a few other Accutrons on my short list.
"At the end of 1959, in anticipation of the launch of a revolutionary new line of watches called Accutron, Bulova designers and craftsmen created tooling that imprinted dial markings on some of the new Accutron plastic crystals. The printed crystal carried all of the information that would normally be found on an Accutron dial. This allowed Bulova to eliminate the dial from several models of the new watches and install a printed crystal, thus exposing the tuning fork and the green colored circuitry inside. Because ordinary plated hands didn't provide enough contrast against the movement to be easily seen from a distance, Bulova used white painted luminous handsets as replacements. The converted watches were only intended to be used as sales aids in order to showcase the revolutionary Accutron tuning fork movement.
Accutron was introduced to the public in October of 1960. Conversion kits and display watches were made available to Bulova dealers worldwide to help them explain how the breakthrough technology worked.
The marketing group at Bulova correctly decided that top-of-the-line solid gold cases would convey a sense of enduring quality to the upstart Accutron technology. Bulova used two 14 kt. gold "Spaceviewed" models in an advertising campaign which was intended to accomplish two things. The 1963 Saturday Evening Post Adidea was to differentiate and create excitement around Accutron's ordinary looking dial models by giving the public a glimpse at the technology inside, and to link the development program which created Accutron to the US space program. The advertising worked brilliantly.

The plan was to build enough of these unusual watches for distribution to dealers who didn't want to bother with converting one from their stock and it is widely believed that Bulova expected to sell at most, a few hundred of the new "Display Model" sales aids to their dealers. That was the plan but the public had other ideas.
Perhaps because of its' uniqueness, potential customers who thought that the watch in the jewelers window was a standard model started asking to buy one. Dealers who didn't want to lose a sale were14Kt Scalloped Lug Spaceview happy to sell the "Display Model" and the strangely attractive watch started selling like hotcakes. Soon, due to popular demand, dealers everywhere clamored for quantities of the new best seller. In response to the unprecedented demand Bulova added the "Spaceview" model to the Accutron line. In 1961 Bulova scrambled to keep up with the demand for the expensive new toys and they were hard pressed to come up with enough of14Kt Alpha Spaceview the 14kt. gold cases.

The marketing people at Bulova now knew that they had a hot commodity and that there was also a market for a less expensive Spaceview model so they decided to design one from scratch. Whereas the first Spaceview crystal was made to replace a dial, the new Spaceview would have a built-in metal minute scale (chapter ring) and the crystal would be imprinted with only the Accutron name and tuning fork logo. The first of these new models in gleaming stainless steel came out (I believe) at the end of 1962. By 1963 (M3) they flew out of Bulova factories and sales of the more expensive solid gold models decreased. Soon, other models of the chapter ring Spaceview were produced in both stainless steel and gold filled cases.
The 14 kt gold Alpha and Scalloped Lug models were available until 1965. The last Accutron Spaceview was made in 1977 when production of the 214 ended.

Spaceview Conversions

Original Spaceview crystals were available from Bulova as replacement parts until around 1992. Dealers continued to use the original Spaceview conversion parts for any case that would accept the dotted crystals but at that time they were not considered to be as desirable as the chapter ring models so the demand for conversions wasn't anywhere near what it is today. An ordinary dial bezel is not machined for, and will not accept a chapter ring under the crystal so it isn't possible to convert a dial model into a factory correct chapter ring Spaceview. This means that any correct chapter ring model is "factory original".

For non-chapter ring models the conversion process is very simple. Providing that the customers' watch accepted one of the few sizes of Spaceview crystals which were available at that time, dealers removed the dial and installed a spacer ring to fill the void left by the dial's absence. White painted Spaceview hands were installed and the Spaceview crystal was installed on the bezel. The whole process takes just a few minutes and was often done while the customer waited.

Because of the popularity and added value of Spaceview models, brand new crystals that fit non-Spaceview models are now being printed with Accutron markings. These Spaceview crystal sizes were never made by Bulova and therefore were not available in the sixties and seventies so they couldn't have been converted at the time of sale.

Relatively few 214 case styles were sold as Spaceview models by Bulova during the 60's and 70's. Of the ones that were, conversions are not easily detected because a properly done modern conversion is almost indistinguishable from the factory model. Among those converted models, a few are very attractive and they are affordable enough to have become popular with many of today's younger generation. "
This is some great information and explains a lot. I hope this helps clear up some peoples miss understanding about spaceviews. I should point out the there are even astronaut models that are spaceviews, and these are custom conversions, yet some people love them. I believe one and only one model 218 was made in the 70's that was a spaceview. If not, then the photographs of one floating around on the net, is also a conversion. Again, hard to say as it could have been done buy a Bulova dealer in the 70's.

Fathertime is another good place for information, as well as mybob.net.
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby eddiea » Thu Dec 18, 2014 12:47 pm

Good read....
Recognizing the Spaceview almost cult status among dedicated fans and historical significance in general, personally I like the re-edition better, original being too small for me, even back in the days , I was never a fan....
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby kahuna74 » Thu Dec 18, 2014 5:13 pm

eddiea wrote:Good read....
Recognizing the Spaceview almost cult status among dedicated fans and historical significance in general, personally I like the re-edition better, original being too small for me, even back in the days , I was never a fan....

I like the re-edition my self. And I agree it is almost a cult status for some of us fans. I just today started the purchase of a Astronaut mark II in solid gold, because for me all Accutrons have my attention. Its only about 39mm case size, so I know some people would take a pass on owning one. For me though, this has me so fucking happy. I see a spaceview anniversary model in my future too.
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby Mortuus Fakeuus » Thu Dec 18, 2014 10:21 pm

Concur with edds; a very good read indeed. (And I sounded like Dr. Suess there, for a second.) I personally appreciate the work you put into this post, as it really does help me with the task of trying to figure out the origin of my particular crystal.

If you wouldn't mind doing me a favor, could you please take a look at the pix of my Spaceview in the WURW page from the other day, and give me your thoughts on (1) where the crystal might have come from (i.e., if not from Bulova), and; (2) what timeframe it might be from. Many thanks in advance, and thanks again for the excellent history lesson... :face:

OBTW, as I told Eddie last week, I'm working on a review of the "New Spaceview." I picked it up a month and a-half ago, and have loved every second it's been on my wrist. I should be done with it next week. 8)
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby eddiea » Thu Dec 18, 2014 10:32 pm

kahuna74 wrote:
eddiea wrote:Good read....
Recognizing the Spaceview almost cult status among dedicated fans and historical significance in general, personally I like the re-edition better, original being too small for me, even back in the days , I was never a fan....

I like the re-edition my self. And I agree it is almost a cult status for some of us fans. I just today started the purchase of a Astronaut mark II in solid gold, because for me all Accutrons have my attention. Its only about 39mm case size, so I know some people would take a pass on owning one. For me though, this has me so fucking happy. I see a spaceview anniversary model in my future too.

Case size and aesthetics in general, are a matter of personal choices and taste, not a reflection on the quality of the watch ...
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby airframer » Thu Dec 18, 2014 10:51 pm

Spaceviews are frickin' cool! Thanks for the write-up, BK.
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby biglove » Fri Dec 19, 2014 9:37 am

Fantastic read! Now I have a far greater understanding of them.
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby kahuna74 » Fri Dec 19, 2014 9:48 am

Mortuus wrote:Concur with edds; a very good read indeed. (And I sounded like Dr. Suess there, for a second.) I personally appreciate the work you put into this post, as it really does help me with the task of trying to figure out the origin of my particular crystal.

If you wouldn't mind doing me a favor, could you please take a look at the pix of my Spaceview in the WURW page from the other day, and give me your thoughts on (1) where the crystal might have come from (i.e., if not from Bulova), and; (2) what timeframe it might be from. Many thanks in advance, and thanks again for the excellent history lesson... :face:

OBTW, as I told Eddie last week, I'm working on a review of the "New Spaceview." I picked it up a month and a-half ago, and have loved every second it's been on my wrist. I should be done with it next week. 8)

It is a Bulova crystal mort. Part # 454-2, with Y or W added to the part#, which would give the color of the markers. W for white, or Y for yellow. They sell for 95.95. So not a cheap NOS crystal to say the least. Find them on watches from both the 60's and 70's. I have even seen them on a 1963 model. I don't know for sure if they started making them in the 60's or the 70's. But I do know you will see them on 214's from any of the 17 years that the 214's were in production.
Someone might jump in here and say that the crystals have a five digit number, that is true, so if you add the W or the Y you end up with a five digit part number. Easy stuff.
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby Mortuus Fakeuus » Fri Dec 19, 2014 1:24 pm

BigKahuna wrote: It is a Bulova crystal mort. Part # 454-2, with Y or W added to the part#, which would give the color of the markers. W for white, or Y for yellow. They sell for 95.95. So not a cheap NOS crystal to say the least. Find them on watches from both the 60's and 70's. I have even seen them on a 1963 model. I don't know for sure if they started making them in the 60's or the 70's. But I do know you will see them on 214's from any of the 17 years that the 214's were in production.
Someone might jump in here and say that the crystals have a five digit number, that is true, so if you add the W or the Y you end up with a five digit part number. Easy stuff.

Awesome info, Big K! That is a huge relief... I just need to take it to my watchmaker to have him take a close look for me...at 26, he's got those great, young eyes. Many thanks, Alan; who knew we had such an expert on the Spaceview right here. :face:

***SIGH*** Time for old Mort to go hunting for a vintage Astronaut to call my own... 8)
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby kahuna74 » Fri Dec 19, 2014 1:31 pm

Mortuus wrote:
BigKahuna wrote: It is a Bulova crystal mort. Part # 454-2, with Y or W added to the part#, which would give the color of the markers. W for white, or Y for yellow. They sell for 95.95. So not a cheap NOS crystal to say the least. Find them on watches from both the 60's and 70's. I have even seen them on a 1963 model. I don't know for sure if they started making them in the 60's or the 70's. But I do know you will see them on 214's from any of the 17 years that the 214's were in production.
Someone might jump in here and say that the crystals have a five digit number, that is true, so if you add the W or the Y you end up with a five digit part number. Easy stuff.

Awesome info, Big K! That is a huge relief... I just need to take it to my watchmaker to have him take a close look for me...at 26, he's got those great, young eyes. Many thanks, Alan; who knew we had such an expert on the Spaceview right here. :face:

***SIGH*** Time for old Mort to go hunting for a vintage Astronaut to call my own... 8)


The "W" or "Y" in the Item Number indicates the color of the "White" or "Yellow" armored ring), Sorry mort I meant the ring but said markers. The armored ring built into the crystal is another reason we know its a Bulova part.
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby Mortuus Fakeuus » Fri Dec 19, 2014 1:36 pm

BigKahuna74 wrote:
Mortuus wrote:
BigKahuna wrote: It is a Bulova crystal mort. Part # 454-2, with Y or W added to the part#, which would give the color of the markers. W for white, or Y for yellow. They sell for 95.95. So not a cheap NOS crystal to say the least. Find them on watches from both the 60's and 70's. I have even seen them on a 1963 model. I don't know for sure if they started making them in the 60's or the 70's. But I do know you will see them on 214's from any of the 17 years that the 214's were in production.
Someone might jump in here and say that the crystals have a five digit number, that is true, so if you add the W or the Y you end up with a five digit part number. Easy stuff.

Awesome info, Big K! That is a huge relief... I just need to take it to my watchmaker to have him take a close look for me...at 26, he's got those great, young eyes. Many thanks, Alan; who knew we had such an expert on the Spaceview right here. :face:

***SIGH*** Time for old Mort to go hunting for a vintage Astronaut to call my own... 8)


The "W" or "Y" in the Item Number indicates the color of the "White" or "Yellow" armored ring), Sorry mort I meant the ring but said markers. The armored ring built into the crystal is another reason we know its a Bulova part.

Understood...thanks. 8)
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Re: Accutron Spaceview History

Postby AJC » Sun Dec 21, 2014 10:38 am

Great post kahuna!
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